Tag Archives: Reviews

A Few Reasons to Read A Reason for God

“A faith without some doubts is like a human body with no antobodies in it. People who blithely go through life too busy or indifferent to ask the hard questions about why they believe as they do will find themselves defenseless against either the experience of tragedy or the probing questions of a smart skeptic. A person’s faith can collapse almost overnight if she failed over the years to listen patiently to her own doubts, which should only be discarded after long reflection.” –Timothy Keller

Presumably a real grad school doesn’t assign books based on what’s available… at this exact moment… for free… in audio format.  But that’s exactly my scientific approach and I’m going with it.  First up in my DIY Seminary plan, then, was Timothy Keller’s Reason for God, because yeah, it came out like a decade ago and I haven’t gotten around to it yet. Don’t judge, yo.

Keller’s book is clear, calm, and rational but also eloquent. I’m sure hearing it read aloud by the man himself influenced my view, but his famously deadpan delivery has a way of making his most impassioned viewpoints seem inevitable.  He’s able to take a heated issue and let the air out slowly before it blows, as when he discusses the Christian view of hell.  You can imagine the blustery critic slowly lowering his rock just before the stoning commenced.

I’d say Reason for God is sure to be a classic apologetic if it weren’t so rooted in our times. But then again, the ideas Keller counters have had a way of popping up repeatedly over the centuries, so maybe it will still speak to the culture in 100 years.  Jesus merely a good person but not really divine?  That idea goes back at least as far as Arius (AD 250-336).  Science has displaced religion as the ultimate truth?  Back to the Enlightenment (which, ironically, was strongly influenced by a good many Christians, for example, Francis Bacon.)  So maybe in our nothing-new-under-the-sun world, each succeeding apologist just puts new wrapping paper on what’s essentially the same set of ideas.

Reason for God isn’t so much a new argument as a very carefully constructed presentation of familiar arguments, one small layer added atop the last until it was quite a pile of convincing thoughts. I’d love to be a fly on the wall if a book club full of agnostics read it together.  And that’s kind of what reading it allows you to do.  Keller frequently quotes and discusses many of the Manhattan intellectuals he runs into, delving into their misgivings about faith and speaking to the issues on their lips.

Reading sharp apologetic books has a way of forcing us to think through our faith critically and address our own lurking doubts honestly.  Over a lifetime, each book adds a new layer of understanding, equipping us to share with confidence not only what we believe, but why.

One quibble.  I hate abridged books.  When I borrowed the audio version from the library, I didn’t see any indication that I was getting a shortened version.  Oh, it’s there, buried in the fine print.  Grrr.  Flipping through a paper copy of my husband’s, I started to see things that looked unfamiliar.  Had I fallen asleep?  Not been paying attention?  Nope.  Thank you, Reader’s Digest version.  Sheesh.

Photo via VisualHunt

Book Medicine, or The Two-Sentence Book Review Challenge

So I was wandering through Costco one day and I accidentally walked down the book aisle.  Well.  Accidental is relative.  I picked up a paperback called The Little Paris Bookshop and decided to give it a new home, because this was on the back cover:  “Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself…”  It was a weak moment, OK?  I am also a sucker for cheesecake samples.

I haven’t read the book yet, but I love the idea of prescribing just the right book for just the right person in just the right season.  I do it all the time, sending books for gifts, thinking long and hard about what book will speak to whom.  Now all I need is a floating bookstore in Paris, and my life will be complete.

So now I find myself in a bit of a reading funk.  I am too busy to read during the day, so all of my reading time is chunked into two big compartments:  devotional reading as I kick off my morning, and light reading as I fall asleep.  The trouble is, I keep falling asleep mid-page.  (Les Mis isn’t keeping me awake what with all of the Napoleonic history.)

So for my own amusement, here is my want-to-read page from Goodreads.  screen-shot-2016-10-30-at-5-45-46-pmSomewhere on this list is my next favorite book (I hope!)  Here’s the big fat favor I’m asking —  help me pick a new book!

I’m taking a poll.  A poll, people.  That means you have to vote.  If you have read any of the books on my list, give me a two-sentence book review in the comment section below and help me choose my next guilty purchase.

If you have a better idea, add a title (and a two-sentence review) below.  And if you should happen to have a free cheesecake sample, you can be my new best friend.

On a related note, I am realizing how awfully hard it is to get reviews for one’s book on Amazon, so if you go to all the trouble to write out a couple sentences here, you may as well copy and paste it on the book’s actual Amazon or Goodreads page, and make that author’s day.  We can be the Make-An-Author’s-Day team, and save despairing authors everywhere from eating their weight in Costco’s free samples department.