Tag Archives: Goodreads

The Best Book You (Almost) Never Read

Maybe it’s the book you rescued from a yard sale, or the one you left abandoned on a shelf for years because the cover was awful.  Maybe it’s one that was mis-shelved at the library right between two of your favorites, and you found yourself looking at it on a whim.  Maybe you happened to hear two people randomly mention it within a few days of each other and then saw a copy on a friend’s coffee table.

Sometimes the best books are the ones we almost never read.

It’s definitely true in the publishing world that many of the most legendary classics are books that almost never saw the light of day…

Poems by Emily Dickinson, discovered after her death.

An unusually fat grade-school novel by an unknown writer rejected 12 times in a row (Harry Potter).

A quirky little picture book about some tea-drinking bunnies that was self-published because no one else wanted it (Peter Rabbit).

Even Moby Dick reportedly sold only 50 copies during Melville’s lifetime.

If you’ve ever read a book by Agatha Christie, Mary Higgins Clark, John Grisham, James Patterson, Madeleine L’Engle, Louis L’Amour, Dr. Seuss, or Margaret Mitchell, you’ve met an author in those pages whose books narrowly escaped dying in a dresser drawer, unpublished.  And it’s not just fluff fiction:  books by Chinua Achebe, E.E. Cummings, Jack Kerouac, William Golding, Alice Walker, James Joyce, George Orwell, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Yann Martel have been insulted, misunderstood, and unceremoniously shot down time and again.  And some that were printed in the author’s lifetime moldered on the bookstore shelves until the writer was dead and gone for decades (ever heard of Jane Austen?)

Aspiring writers often moan about the devilish catch-22 of getting anything published without platform when platform is so hard to achieve if you haven’t been published.  But our problem is hardly new to the internet age.  (Joseph Heller himself felt it, too.)  Loads of manuscripts pile up on publishers’ desks, and the poor guys/gals have to sort through the Pulitzers and the drivel without the help of a crystal ball.  They’re searching for the needle in a papery haystack.

At Blackwell’s in Oxford, I saw a great display of books wrapped in brown paper with just a handwritten teaser on the front.  “Wildly imaginative story about a shipwreck, a tiger, and the meaning of life.”  “One victim, a dozen suspects, all stranded on a luxury train in a blizzard.”  “A puzzle book written in exquisite prose, perfect for fans of so-and-so.”  What a super idea!  Pick the book blind, not for its reputation or its famous author or its fancy cover art; let it speak on its own terms.

Last year my reading resolution was to review the books I read (on Goodreads, Amazon, wherever).  What if next year’s reading resolution went something like this:  for every book I read because I already know and love the author I’ll try one by someone unknown?  For every bestseller I’ll browse the shelves for one I’ve never heard of?

What if we don’t let the big shots in New York dictate what we’ll read this year, but look for the treasure in the brown paper bag?

You can click on my Want-to-Read pile at Goodreads for some inspiration if you want.  But I’m on the lookout, too, so give me your best suggestions below.  What’s a book we’ve never heard of that you know we’d all love?

What’s the best book you almost never read?

Photo on Visual hunt

Book Medicine, or The Two-Sentence Book Review Challenge

So I was wandering through Costco one day and I accidentally walked down the book aisle.  Well.  Accidental is relative.  I picked up a paperback called The Little Paris Bookshop and decided to give it a new home, because this was on the back cover:  “Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself…”  It was a weak moment, OK?  I am also a sucker for cheesecake samples.

I haven’t read the book yet, but I love the idea of prescribing just the right book for just the right person in just the right season.  I do it all the time, sending books for gifts, thinking long and hard about what book will speak to whom.  Now all I need is a floating bookstore in Paris, and my life will be complete.

So now I find myself in a bit of a reading funk.  I am too busy to read during the day, so all of my reading time is chunked into two big compartments:  devotional reading as I kick off my morning, and light reading as I fall asleep.  The trouble is, I keep falling asleep mid-page.  (Les Mis isn’t keeping me awake what with all of the Napoleonic history.)

So for my own amusement, here is my want-to-read page from Goodreads.  screen-shot-2016-10-30-at-5-45-46-pmSomewhere on this list is my next favorite book (I hope!)  Here’s the big fat favor I’m asking —  help me pick a new book!

I’m taking a poll.  A poll, people.  That means you have to vote.  If you have read any of the books on my list, give me a two-sentence book review in the comment section below and help me choose my next guilty purchase.

If you have a better idea, add a title (and a two-sentence review) below.  And if you should happen to have a free cheesecake sample, you can be my new best friend.

On a related note, I am realizing how awfully hard it is to get reviews for one’s book on Amazon, so if you go to all the trouble to write out a couple sentences here, you may as well copy and paste it on the book’s actual Amazon or Goodreads page, and make that author’s day.  We can be the Make-An-Author’s-Day team, and save despairing authors everywhere from eating their weight in Costco’s free samples department.