Stacking the odds.

“Best part?” he asks every night at supper. And the kids shout out, especially the happy ones,

“Playing with Legos and building a Star Wars/Lord of the Rings/Velociraptor!”

“Eating doughnuts for breakfast!”

“Being here with you, Dad.” That one makes a regular appearance, equal parts delightful and deliberate.

But some days the kids are grouchy, ungrateful, little fists holding their grudges tight. And some days you wake up to gray skies and the dread in the stomach, and the hours stretch in front of you scary. There isn’t liable to be a best part those days.

So what happens if you stack your odds? Make a moment that will make the list, on purpose. Gonna be a crummy day? Let’s have pancakes for breakfast. Pancakes are good. Or I’m not going to get it all done anyway, so let’s take 30 minutes to head to the park. That’s worth a smile. Light a candle, play an 80s song, eat chocolate, wear the funny socks, send a card… And what if you don’t save the best for last, but grab the best first?

I am learning, day after homeschooling day, that being stingy with rewards — the nice thing will come after I get the desired results — is usually frustrating. I am rewarding something that’s not really good enough, or withholding a reward that someone self-righteously feels they deserve, holding the stick and carrot high all the day, wheedling. Why not give big first — this is grace — reap the smiles, sail into the hard things with a breeze at your back and the sun on your face?

I learned this first as a writer from Annie Dillard. In The Writing Life, she says: “One of the things I know about writing is this: spend it all, shoot it, play it, lose it, all, right away, every time. Do not hoard what seems good for a later place in the book or for another book; give it, give it all, give it now. The impulse to save something good for a better place later is the signal to spend it now. Something more will arise for later, something better. These things fill from behind, from beneath, like well water. Similarly, the impulse to keep to yourself what you have learned is not only shameful, it is destructive. Anything you do not give freely and abundantly becomes lost to you. You open your safe and find ashes.”

So wise. The manna hoarded for the next morning turned to rot. The laugh withheld turns to sighs. Might as well start your day happy, and who knows? Maybe that will change the whole day.

One thought on “Stacking the odds.”

  1. Oh, my goodness. So glad I found you. This is so so so true. Believe it or not, though a writer, though a fan of Annie Dillard, I have never read that book. Now I think I will. Even if I had known the quote, I would not have thought of it in this context.

    I just wrote about some writing advice from Anne Rice (I know, I know, a whole other level of writing… don’t judge me… lol… her advice is actually REALLY GOOD) and similarly applied it to why we’re still homeschooling (Friday’s post on my blog). Amazing how much of writing advice is true for life too. I think that’s how you know it’s good advice.

    Thank you for sharing this.

    Like

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